Exhibitions

 

Festivities Are Cancelled!” exhibition by Hudrada curatorial group (Ukraine)

The exhibition “Festivities Are Cancelled!” is dedicated to the memory of revolution and the phenomenon of censorship. The first part of the exhibition will take place in the “UFO” building of the Institute of Scientific, Technical, and Economic Information and features performative statements related to political foresight and the hope for social change. The second part of the exhibition will be in the Pavlo Tychyna Literary-Memorial Museum-Apartment and will continue the prior statements with a talk about Soviet censorship and its traces within current social practices.

October 21 – November 26, Institute of Scientific, Technical and Economic Information (“UFO”, 180 Antonovycha St., metro Lybidska).

October 26 – November 26, Pavlo Tychyna Literary-Memorial Museum-Apartment (5 Tereshchenkivska St., ap. 1, 3, metro “Teatralna”).

“Dead Souls” exhibition by Marina Naprushkina (Germany) and Oliver Ressler (Austria)

In the “Dead Souls” exhibition at Visual Culture Research Center Marina Naprushkina will present the key provisions within EU asylum and migration policy, which often lead to serious economic and social inequalities – the borders are so sealed, in fact, that asylum seekers are oftentimes hardly able to reach “the safe shore.” Oliver Ressler will focus on struggles to obtain citizenship while, at the same time, questioning the implicitly exclusionary nature of the concept. He will also investigate the rare case of occupied factories, in which the purpose of these organized struggles is to bring production under workers’ control.

October 22 – November 26,Visual Culture Research Center (44 Hlybochytska St., trams #14, #18 from metro Kontraktova Ploshcha).

“Market” exhibition (curated by Hanna Tsyba, Ukraine)

The buildings of Ukrainian indoor markets, constructed in the 1960s–1980s, are unique monuments to late modernism. However, these structures are not formally recognized by Ukrainian law and are thus amenable to devastating renovations. The purpose of the “Market” project is to draw attention to these buildings as newly discovered monuments by exploring the history of their architecture, and by reflecting on the contexts of their creation and existence in the past, present and future. The exhibition will take place at the Kyiv Zhytniy Market, which was constructed in 1980 in the so-called International style.

October 28 – November 26, Zhytniy Market (16 Verkhniy Val St., metro Kontraktova Ploshcha).

“Dance, Dance, Dance” exhibition (curated by Serge Klymko, Ukraine)

The image of a rave, buried in the late 90s, has recently been resurrected, but this time much farther to the East than East Berlin. Kyiv is proclaimed to be one of its monasteries, having been discovered by Western pilgrims amid a riot, the square, democracy, and all else that lies North of the Wall. The New East, marked by a new politico-poetic formation of freedom and vital energy, has become a sanctuary for those seeking life outside the fortress of the Old World. Tracking down these self-proclaimed ‘new Berlins,’ the exhibition at BURSA GALLERY takes a look at the post-Soviet dance scene as a luminous symptom of social and political processes.

November 11 – December 10, BURSA GALLERY (11-B Kostyantynivska St., metro Kontraktova Ploshcha).